CHAT 9 - Visions of Albion:  Samuel Palmer and William Blake

CHAT 9 - Visions of Albion: Samuel Palmer and William Blake

15th Sep 2022 19:00 - 21:00

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2022-09-15 19:00:00 2022-09-15 21:00:00 Europe/London CHAT 9 - Visions of Albion: Samuel Palmer and William Blake Rachel Campbell-Johnston is the chief art critic and poetry critic for The Times. She studied English Literature at the University of Edinburgh and has a PhD in modern and contemporary British poetry. Her first book, Mysterious Wisdom: The Life and Work of Samuel Palmer, was published to great acclaim in 2011. The Child's Elephant is her first book for children. Rachel lives in the country with her family and an assortment of animals.The story of how the young Samuel Palmer met the ageing William Blake and how, rescuing this great visionary from a lifetime of heartbreaking neglect, he built on our quintessentially British traditions to create pictures which, if our culture had ever encompassed the making of icons, would not have been so different from his glowing pastorals. https://tickets.cedarshallwells.co.uk/events/40673/chat-9-visions-of-albion-samuel-palmer-and-william-blake 15 The Liberty, Somerset, Wells, BA5 2ST

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Event Details

Rachel Campbell-Johnston is the chief art critic and poetry critic for The Times. She studied English Literature at the University of Edinburgh and has a PhD in modern and contemporary British poetry. 

Her first book, Mysterious Wisdom: The Life and Work of Samuel Palmer, was published to great acclaim in 2011. The Child's Elephant is her first book for children. Rachel lives in the country with her family and an assortment of animals.

The story of how the young Samuel Palmer met the ageing William Blake and how, rescuing this great visionary from a lifetime of heartbreaking neglect, he built on our quintessentially British traditions to create pictures which, if our culture had ever encompassed the making of icons, would not have been so different from his glowing pastorals.